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    Video

    roseonplanetq:

    Athanasius Kircher’s diagrams of the interconnectedness of fire (above) and water (below) in Earth.  The diagrams are just a piece of his large, multi-volume work Mundus Subterraneus, published in 1665.



    Reblogged from The 50 Watts tumblr.
    Tags: mind maps

    April 23, 2014, 8:34pm

    439 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph

    athousandmilesaday:

Solange Knopf

    athousandmilesaday:

    Solange Knopf



    Reblogged from Radimus.co.uk.
    Tags: mind maps

    April 23, 2014, 5:09pm

    95 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Video

    myampgoesto11:

    Nikolaus Gansterer: The Gray Matter Hypothesis

    chalk drawing on black wall, 2013

    a diagram showing internal correlations and their external consequences marked out by key figures of thought balancing between reflecting and representing symbols of power affected by the structures of human experience and the various forms of interpretation.”

    My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram



    Reblogged from The Imaginarium Of Jacs Fishburne.
    Tags: mind maps

    April 22, 2014, 6:51am

    14,583 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph



    Reblogged from Art References.

    Tags: mind maps

    February 11, 2014, 10:17pm

    2,894 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph

    aesza:

Medusa (FJ Bertuch, ‘Bilderbuch fur Kinder’, 1798) via peacay on Flickr.

    aesza:

    Medusa (FJ Bertuch, ‘Bilderbuch fur Kinder’, 1798) via peacay on Flickr.



    Reblogged from THEREMINA.
    Tags: mind maps

    January 10, 2014, 7:43pm

    649 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph

    (Source: bodyandlight)



    Reblogged from Scientific Illustration.
    Tags: mind maps

    January 10, 2014, 10:35am

    488 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph

    Movie Maps by Illustrator Andrew Degraff

    Movie Maps by Illustrator Andrew Degraff



    January 05, 2014, 6:51pm

    4 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph

    maptitude1:

This diagram, made in 1850 by cartographer J. H. Colton, shows the relative sizes of waterfalls, lakes, islands, rivers, and mountains of the world.

    maptitude1:

    This diagram, made in 1850 by cartographer J. H. Colton, shows the relative sizes of waterfalls, lakes, islands, rivers, and mountains of the world.



    Reblogged from Scientific Illustration.
    Tags: mind maps

    October 03, 2013, 6:52pm

    830 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph

    acheiropoietos:

Opening Page Illumination from the manuscript of the Shahnama of FirdawsiIran, Shiraz, Timurid Period, 15th centuryc. 1444 

    acheiropoietos:

    Opening Page Illumination from the manuscript of the Shahnama of Firdawsi
    Iran, Shiraz, Timurid Period, 15th century
    c. 1444 



    Reblogged from THEREMINA.
    Tags: mind maps

    August 14, 2013, 10:17pm

    723 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph

    Another day, another to do list.

    Another day, another to do list.



    March 14, 2013, 7:18pm

    10 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)

    On Mind Maps and Dyslexia

    Text

    Why do I need mind-maps?

    "There are a few things you need to know:

    First, I am lucky enough to have a number of positive impacts of dyslexia. One of those is that once I have acquired new information I can process it very rapidly and often have multiple thoughts at once. That often means that I can solve the most complex problems faster than others.

    Second, I have a problem writing and thinking at the same time. I believe it is to do with short-term memory. However, the bottom line is that I keep forgetting where I am in the overall flow of the thing that I am writing. As a result, my writing meanders and needs to be edited (by me) again and again until it finally expresses what I mean.

    Thirdly, I see patterns in things – often before others. I use that to form and then set out compelling arguments and explanations that become very clear to readers.

    Finally, I have a fairly precise use of language and so – whilst not finding it easy to write – am a fierce critic of my own work. So that means the editing can take a very long time.”

    from MindMaps are the answer…. what’s the question?



    January 30, 2013, 6:51am

    4 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Video

    thenearsightedmonkey:

    Image by Jakob Mohr, Beweisse [Proofs], ca. 1910. Courtesy Prinzhorn Collection, University of Heidelberg.

    Dear Unthinkable Mind Class,

    What happens when people draw something they are experiencing? Do they need to be ‘good at drawing’ to get the image to come alive for themselves or others? Would you call the picture above a ‘good drawing’?

    What else is it?

    See you soon!

    Professor Lynda


    From “The Influencing Machine” - by Christopher Turner

    Source: Cabinet Magazine

    In 1919, Victor Tausk, a disciple of Sigmund Freud, committed suicide by simultaneously hanging and shooting himself. “I have no melancholy,” he wrote in his suicide note, which was addressed to Freud. “My suicide is the healthiest, most decent deed of my unsuccessful life.” His essay, “On the origin of the ‘Influencing Machine’ in Schizophrenia,” which has since become a classic in psychiatric literature, had just been published. 


    In the article, Tausk described the elaborate mechanical devices that paranoid schizophrenics invent in their imaginations to explain away their mental disintegration. As the boundaries between the schizophrenic’s mind and the world break down, they often feel themselves persecuted by “machines of a mystical nature,” which supposedly work by means of radio-waves, telepathy, x-rays, invisible wires, or other mysterious forces. The machines are believed to be operated by enemies as instruments of torture and mind-control, and the operators are thought to be able to implant and remove ideas and feelings, and inflict pain, from a distance. 


    Influencing Machines are described by their troubled inventors as complex structures, constructed of “boxes, cranks, levers, wheels, buttons, wires, batteries and the like.” Sometimes these devices are thought to be their doubles, unconscious projections of their fragmented bodily experience. Patients will typically invoke all the powers known to technology to explain their obscure workings. Nevertheless, they always transcend attempts at giving a coherent account of their function: “All the discoveries of mankind,” Tausk asserts, “are regarded as inadequate to explain the marvelous powers of this machine.” 


    Tausk took his term from an apparently magical device invented in 1706 by Francis Hauksbee, a student of Isaac Newton. His “Influence Machine” was a spinning glass globe, which cracked like lightning when touched, transmitting an electrical spark and emitting a greenish neon light when rubbed—a mysterious luminosity which was called “the glow of life.” These apparently supernatural effects were caused by the introduction of static electricity into a vacuum; it worked like the shimmering vacuum tube of the modern TV. Its psychological incarnation had similarly mesmerizing effects: “The influencing machine,” Tausk wrote, “makes the patients see pictures. When this is the case, the machine is generally a magic lantern or cinematograph. The pictures are seen on a single plane, on walls or windowpanes; unlike typical visual hallucinations, they are not three-dimensional.”


    The psychiatrist Hans Prinzhorn began collecting for his famous Museum of Pathological Art the same year that Tausk published his essay (within a year Prinzhorn had acquired forty-five hundred works, which are currently housed in the Psychiatric University Hospital in Heidelberg, Germany). One of these images illustrates an Influencing Machine in strikingly graphic form. The artist was Jakob Mohr, a farmer and hawker suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, and his picture shows someone holding a small box which resembles an old-fashioned camera and transmits something like static at its victim. The structural workings of the contraption are explained in a palimpsest of scribbled notes, which Prinzhorn called “word salad.” The operator, who is thought to be the psychiatrist (he wears headphones so that he can listen in on Mohr’s thoughts), aims a radiation tube at his subject that emits “electric waves” and renders him a “hypnotic slave.” The machine’s energy flows two ways—it is a magnet as well as a gun: “Waves are pulled out of me,” Mohr scrawled, “through the positive electrical fluorescent attraction of the organic positive pole as the remote hypnotizer through the earth.” The appliance’s malevolent power over Mohr is illustrated by a series of childishly drawn arrows and wavy tentacles which unite both men in a painful-looking spasm of electricity.


    Continue reading at Cabinet Magazine…



    Reblogged from The Near-Sighted Monkey.

    January 27, 2013, 8:34pm

    111 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph

    lookingforether:

“Our brains are a vastly parallel and distributed system, each with a gazillion decision-making points and centers of integration. The 24/7 brain never stops managing our thoughts, desires, and bodies. The millions of networks are a sea of forces, not single soldiers waiting for the commander to speak. It is also a determined system, not a freewheeling cowboy acting outside the physical, chemical forces that fill up our universe. And yet, these modern-day facts do not in the least convince us there is not a central “you,” a “self” calling the shots in each of us. Again, that is the puzzle, and our task is to try and understand how it all might work.” - Michael S.Gazzaniga 

    lookingforether:

    “Our brains are a vastly parallel and distributed system, each with a gazillion decision-making points and centers of integration. The 24/7 brain never stops managing our thoughts, desires, and bodies. The millions of networks are a sea of forces, not single soldiers waiting for the commander to speak. It is also a determined system, not a freewheeling cowboy acting outside the physical, chemical forces that fill up our universe. And yet, these modern-day facts do not in the least convince us there is not a central “you,” a “self” calling the shots in each of us. Again, that is the puzzle, and our task is to try and understand how it all might work.” - Michael S.Gazzaniga 



    Reblogged from The Near-Sighted Monkey.

    January 22, 2013, 10:17am

    210 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph

    continuo-docs:

Ancient Egyptian music notationFrom a set of 6 parchments described by German musicologist Hans Hickmann in his 1956 book Musicologie Pharaonique, or Music under the Pharaohs, as dating from the 5th to 7th centuries C.E. Colors are presumed to indicate pitch and size to indicate duration. Writings on the parchment are in Coptic with indications like “Spiritual Harmony” and “Holy Hymn Singer”. This manuscript had a profound influence on Egyptian composer Halim El-Dabh’s music notation and paintings when he discovered a reproduction in Vogue magazine in 1952.
Note: I wasn’t able to locate these manuscripts and couldn’t find any reference to them online, but they are presumably in NY’s Metropolitan Museum collections. This image comes from Theresa Sauer’s book Notations 21, Mark Batty Publisher, USA, 2009.

    continuo-docs:

    Ancient Egyptian music notation
    From a set of 6 parchments described by German musicologist Hans Hickmann in his 1956 book Musicologie Pharaonique, or Music under the Pharaohs, as dating from the 5th to 7th centuries C.E. Colors are presumed to indicate pitch and size to indicate duration. Writings on the parchment are in Coptic with indications like “Spiritual Harmony” and “Holy Hymn Singer”. This manuscript had a profound influence on Egyptian composer Halim El-Dabh’s music notation and paintings when he discovered a reproduction in Vogue magazine in 1952.

    Note: I wasn’t able to locate these manuscripts and couldn’t find any reference to them online, but they are presumably in NY’s Metropolitan Museum collections. This image comes from Theresa Sauer’s book Notations 21, Mark Batty Publisher, USA, 2009.



    Reblogged from Miss Spite's Miscellany.
    Tags: mind maps

    January 18, 2013, 5:08pm

    1,931 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)
    Photograph

    How We Use Maps and Globes

    How We Use Maps and Globes



    Tags: mind maps

    January 06, 2013, 3:26am

    4 notes, Tweet, Comments (View)