The Electronical Rattle Bag

Jul 21

42/365.
Daisies on a summer evening.
Overlayed the subject using #photoblender.
Pencil and fountain pen. 
Notebook: Ethel.

42/365.
Daisies on a summer evening.
Overlayed the subject using #photoblender.
Pencil and fountain pen.
Notebook: Ethel.

Jul 20

(via ekstasis)

41/365.
Caster wheel on very old piece of furniture we just repurposed into a different part of the house. 
We are undergoing a major reorganising,  lots of memories being resurfaced. 
Pencil and fountain pen.
Notebook: Leonidas.

41/365.
Caster wheel on very old piece of furniture we just repurposed into a different part of the house.
We are undergoing a major reorganising, lots of memories being resurfaced.
Pencil and fountain pen.
Notebook: Leonidas.

49/365.
Flars. 
I fckn luv flars. 
Pencil and fountain pen. 
Notebook: Ethel.

49/365.
Flars.
I fckn luv flars.
Pencil and fountain pen.
Notebook: Ethel.

[video]

Jul 19

(via A mysterious new road sign has appeared in Clifton Wood.)

(via A mysterious new road sign has appeared in Clifton Wood.)

Jul 17

39/365
Wacom pen, wand of power.
Slightly less magical since they added those silly buttons down the side of the tablet there.
Drawn at work whilst waiting for something to happen,  which seems to be occurring a lot today.
Pencil.
Notebook: Ethel.
Mood: Impatient.

39/365
Wacom pen, wand of power.
Slightly less magical since they added those silly buttons down the side of the tablet there.
Drawn at work whilst waiting for something to happen, which seems to be occurring a lot today.
Pencil.
Notebook: Ethel.
Mood: Impatient.

Jul 16

meaningshouldbeprevented:

_MG_3693s by krysolove on Flickr.

meaningshouldbeprevented:

_MG_3693s by krysolove on Flickr.

38/365.
Sometimes it’s good draw stuff just to calm yourself down.
A complicated week continued today when, amongst other things, a computer power unit died loudly in my actual face.
This is Fudge. Look he’s dug up somebody else’s flowers,  he wants to be your friend. 
I wrote some comics about him.
They’re on the internet.  
They end badly. 
Fountain pen. 
Notebook: Zebulon.

38/365.
Sometimes it’s good draw stuff just to calm yourself down.
A complicated week continued today when, amongst other things, a computer power unit died loudly in my actual face.
This is Fudge. Look he’s dug up somebody else’s flowers, he wants to be your friend.
I wrote some comics about him.
They’re on the internet.
They end badly.
Fountain pen.
Notebook: Zebulon.

publicfruit:

australia
copyright e_albrecht 2014

publicfruit:

australia

copyright e_albrecht 2014

comicsworkbook:

Warren Craghead ///// Fauves 60












Made for Comics Workbook

comicsworkbook:

Warren Craghead ///// Fauves 60

Made for Comics Workbook

mollybroxton:

blister pack

mollybroxton:

blister pack

Jul 15

[video]

thememoryofacolor:

Johannes Hevelius, Selenographia

thememoryofacolor:

Johannes Hevelius, Selenographia

(via bloodmilk)

theantidote:

King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus’s creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the centre. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the centre and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”
(via likeafieldmouse:)

theantidote:

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus’s creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the centre. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the centre and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

(via likeafieldmouse:)