The Electronical Rattle Bag

Internet scrapbook of Paul Greer (@burningfp). Animation, etc.
43/365.
Not from life, from brain.
Eye flowers crop up from time to time.
This one asks for rain, the heavens bestow. 
There was a baby hedgehog out and about in our garden today. Apparently they venture out in daylight when they are thirsty. Family members left out (specially purchased) cat food and some water to drink. Like carrots and brandy for a very small spikey Father Christmas.
Fingers crossed all is well. 
‘Night.
V-ball.
Notebook: Ethel.

43/365.
Not from life, from brain.
Eye flowers crop up from time to time.
This one asks for rain, the heavens bestow.
There was a baby hedgehog out and about in our garden today. Apparently they venture out in daylight when they are thirsty. Family members left out (specially purchased) cat food and some water to drink. Like carrots and brandy for a very small spikey Father Christmas.
Fingers crossed all is well.
‘Night.
V-ball.
Notebook: Ethel.

41/365.
Caster wheel on very old piece of furniture we just repurposed into a different part of the house. 
We are undergoing a major reorganising,  lots of memories being resurfaced. 
Pencil and fountain pen.
Notebook: Leonidas.

41/365.
Caster wheel on very old piece of furniture we just repurposed into a different part of the house.
We are undergoing a major reorganising, lots of memories being resurfaced.
Pencil and fountain pen.
Notebook: Leonidas.

anthonymeloro:

No Time

The above examples show some of the basic differences between Bronze Age and contemporary (mainstream) comic “reading”.  The most obvious characteristic is contemporary comic’s lack of text.  Now before you get all sweaty and belch out something incoherent - yes, I realize this is a singular comparison.  That stated, however, I tend to notice how I’m blazing through recent titles due to the primary focus on action (violence) and less on exposition.  Is one better than the other?  Not the point.  I view this more as a shift to how we consume information: fast and, at times, without complete context.

Ben Marra nicely sums up comic’s current stand on compositions/pacing in relation to refrained use of thought balloons:

A lot of mainstream books don’t use Thought Balloons because they want comic books to be more like movies, where thought balloons can’t exist. They want comic books to be pitches for movie content. Who can blame them when these movies make billions of dollars? The movie executives they’re pitching to don’t like thought balloons I guess. (It’s also the reason why you see a lot of mainstream comics using “widescreen” panels. This makes it easier for movie executives to envision the comic book panels as storyboard or compositions on a screen).

Lastly, Shalvey does a stellar job creating a Morris Day inspired villian.

Please click on pix for artist credits.